So You Think you Have Enough Bandwidth?


There are actually only two tiers of bandwidth , video for all, and not video for all. It is a fairly black and white problem. If you secure enough bandwidth such that 25 to 30 percent of your users can simultaneously watch video feeds, and still have some head room on your circuit, congratulations  – you have reached bandwidth nirvana.

Why is video the lynchpin in this discussion?

Aside from the occasional iOS/Windows update, most consumers really don’t use that much bandwidth on a regular basis. Skype, chat, email, and gaming, all used together, do not consume as much bandwidth as video. Hence, the marker species for congestion is video.

Below, I present some of the metrics to see if you can mothball your bandwidth shaper.

1) How to determine the future bandwidth demand.
Believe it or not, you can outrun your bandwidth demand, if your latest bandwidth upgrade is large enough to handle the average video load per customer.  Then it is possible that no further upgrades will be needed, at least in the foreseeable future.

In the “Video for all” scenario the rule of thumb is you can assume 25 percent of your subscribers watching video at any one time.  If you still have 20 percent of your bandwidth left over, you have reached the video for all threshold.

To put some numbers to this
Assume 2000 subscribers, and a 1 gigabit link. The average video feed will require about 2 megabits. (note some HD video is higher than this )  This would mean, to support video 25 percent of your subscribers would use the entire 1 gigabit and there is nothing left over anybody else, hence you will run out of  bandwidth.

Now if you have 1.5 gigabits for 2000 subscribers you have likely reached the video for all threshold, and most likely you will be able to support them without any advanced intelligent bandwidth control . A simple 10 megabit rate cap per subscriber is likely all you would need.

2) Honeymoon periods are short-lived.
The reason why the reprieve in congestion after a bandwidth upgrade is so short-lived is usually because the operator either does not have a good intelligent bandwidth control solution, or they take their existing solution out thinking mistakenly they have reached the “video for all” level.  In reality, they are still under the auspices of the video not for all. They are lulled into a false sense of security for a brief honeymoon period.  After the upgrade things are okay. It takes a while for a user base to fill the void of a new bandwidth upgrade.

Bottom line: Unless you have the numbers to support 25 to 30 percent of your user base running video you will need some kind of bandwidth control.

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