$1000 Discount Offered Through NetEqualizer Cash For Conversion Program


After witnessing the overwhelming popularity of the government’s Cash for Clunkers new car program, we’ve decided to offer a similar deal to potential NetEqualizer customers. Therefore, this week, we’re announcing the launch of our Cash for Conversion program.The program offers owners of select brands (see below) of network optimization technology a $1000 credit toward the list-price purchase of NetEqualizer NE2000-10 or higher models (click here for a full price list). All owners have to do is send us your old (working or not) or out of license bandwidth control technology. Products from the following manufacturers will be accepted:

  • Exinda
  • Packeteer/Blue Coat
  • Allot
  • Cymphonics
  • Procera

In addition to receiving the $1000 credit toward a NetEqualizer, program participants will also have the peace of mind of knowing that their old technology will be handled responsibly through refurbishment or electronics recycling programs.

Only the listed manufacturers’ products will qualify. Offer good through the Labor Day weekend (September 7, 2009). For more information, contact us at 303-997-1300 or admin@apconnections.net.

Top Tips To Quantify The Cost Of WAN Optimization


Editor’s Note: As we mentioned in a recent article, there’s often some confusion when it comes to how WAN optimization fits into the overall network optimization industry — especially when compared to Internet optimization. Although similar, the two techniques require different approaches to optimization. What follows are some simple questions to ask your vendor before you purchase a WAN optimization appliance. For the record, the NetEqualizer is primarily used for Internet optimization.

When presenting a WAN optimization ROI argument, your vendor rep will clearly make a compelling case for savings.  The ROI case will be made by amortizing the cost of equipment against your contracted rate from your provider. You can and should trust these basic raw numbers. However, there is more to evaluating a WAN optimization (packet shaping) appliance than comparing equipment cost against bandwidth savings. Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  1. The amortization schedule should also make reasonable assumptions about future costs for T1, DS3, and OC3 links. Most contracted rates have been dropping in many metro areas and it is reasonable to assume that bandwidth costs will perhaps be 50-percent less two to three years out.
  2. If you do increase bandwidth, the licensing costs for the traffic shaping equipment can increase substantially. You may also find yourself in a situation where you need to do a forklift upgrade as you outrun your current hardware.
  3. Recurring licensing costs are often mandatory to keep your equipment current. Without upgrading your license, your deep packet inspection (layer 7 shaping filters) will become obsolete.
  4. Ongoing labor costs to tune and re-tune your WAN optimization appliance can often costs thousands per week.
  5. The good news is that optimization companies will normally allow you to try an appliance before you buy. Make sure you take the time to manage the equipment with your own internal techs or IT consultant to get an idea of how it will fit into your network.  The honeymoon with new equipment (supported by a well trained pre-sales team) can be short lived. After the free pre-sale support has expired, you will be on your own.

There are certainly times when WAN optimization makes sense, yet it many cases, what appears to be a no-brainer decision at first will begin to be called into question as costs mount down the line. Hopefully these five contributing factors will paint a clearer picture of what to expect.

Created by APconnections, the NetEqualizer is a plug-and-play bandwidth control and WAN/Internet optimization appliance that is flexible and scalable. When the network is congested, NetEqualizer’s unique “behavior shaping” technology dynamically and automatically gives priority to latency sensitive applications, such as VoIP and email. Click here for a full price list.

Hitchhiker’s Guide To Network And WAN Optimization Technology


Manufacturers make all sorts of claims about speeding up your network with special technologies, in the following pages we’ll take a look at the different types of technologies explaining them in such a way that you the Consumer can make an informed decision on what is right for you.

Table of Contents

  • Compression – Relies on data patterns that can be represented more efficiently. Best suited for point to point leased lines.
  • Caching – Relies on human behavior , accessing the same data over and over. Best suited for point to point leased lines, but also viable for Internet Connections and VPN tunnels.
  • Protocol Spoofing – Best suited for Point to Point WAN links.
  • Application Shaping – Controls data usage based on spotting specific patterns in the data. Best suited for both point to point leased lines and Internet connections. Very expensive to maintain in both initial cost, ongoing costs and labor.
  • Equalizing – Makes assumptions on what needs immediate priority based on the data usage. Excellent choice for Internet connections and clogged VPN tunnels.
  • Connection Limits – Prevents access gridlock in routers and access points. Best suited for Internet access where p2p usage is clogging your network.
  • Simple Rate Limits – Prevents one user from getting more than a fixed amount of data. Best suited as a stop gap first effort for a remedying a congested Internet connection with a limited budget.

Compression

At first glance, the term compression seems intuitively obvious. Most people have at one time or another extracted a compressed Zip windows file. Examining the file sizes pre and post extraction reveals there is more data on the hard drive after the extraction. WAN compression products use some of the same principles only they compress the data on the WAN link and decompress it automatically once delivered, thus saving space on the link, making the network more efficient. Even though you likely understand compression on a Windows file conceptually, it would be wise to understand what is really going on under the hood during compression before making an investment to reduce network costs. Some questions to consider: How does compression really work? Are there situations where it may not work at all?

How it Works

A good, easy to visualize analogy to data compression is the use of short hand when taking dictation. By using a single symbol for common words a scribe can take written dictation much faster than if he were to spell out each entire word. Thus the basic principle behind compression techniques is to use shortcuts to represent common data. Commercial compression algorithms, although similar in principle, vary widely in practice. Each company offering a solution typically has their own trade secrets that they closely guard for a competitive advantage.

There are a few general rules common to all strategies. One technique is to encode a repeated character within a data file. For a simple example let’s suppose we were compressing this very document and as a format separator we had a row with a solid dash.

The data for this solid dash line is comprised of approximately 160 times the ASCII character “-�. When transporting the document across a WAN link without compression this line of document would require 80bytes of data, but with clever compression we can encode this using a special notation “-� X 160.

The compression device at the front end would read the 160 character line and realize: “Duh, this is stupid. Why send the same character 160 times in a row?” so it would incorporate a special code to depict the data more efficiently.

Perhaps that was obvious, but it is important know a little bit about compression techniques to understand the limits of their effectiveness. There are many types of data that cannot be efficiently compressed.

For example: many image and voice recordings are already optimized and there is very little improvement in data size that can be accomplished with compression techniques. The companies that sell compression based solutions should be able to provide you with profiles on what to expect based on the type of data sent on your WAN link.

Caching

Suppose you are the administrator for a network, and you have a group of a 1000 users that wake up promptly at 7:00 am each morning and immediately go to MSNBC.com to retrieve the latest news from Wall Street. This synchronized behavior would create 1000 simultaneous requests for the same remote page on the Internet.

Or, in the corporate world, suppose the CEO of a multinational 10,000 employee business, right before the holidays put out an all points 20 page PDF file on the corporate site describing the new bonus plan? As you can imagine all the remote WAN links might get bogged down for hours while each and every employee tried to download this file.

Well it does not take a rocket scientist to figure out that if somehow the MSNBC home page could be stored locally on an internal server that would alleviate quite a bit of pressure on your WAN link.

And in the case of the CEO memo, if a single copy of the PDF file was placed locally at each remote office it would alleviate the rush of data.

Caching does just that.

Offered by various vendors Caching can be very effective in many situations, and vendors can legitimately make claims of tremendous WAN speed improvement in some situations. Caching servers have built in intelligence to store the most recently and most frequently requested information, thus preventing future requests from traversing the WAN link unnecessarily .

You may know that most desktop browsers do their own form caching already. Many web servers keep a time stamp of their last update to data , and browsers such as the popular Internet Explorer will use a cached copy of a remote page after checking the time stamp.

So what is the downside of caching?

There are two main issues that can arise with caching:

  1. Keeping the cache current. If you access a cache page that is not current then you are at risk of getting old and incorrect information. Some things you may never want to be cached, for example the results of a transactional database query. It’s not that these problems are insurmountable, but there is always the risk that the data in cache will not be synchronized with changes.
  2. Volume. There are some 60 million web sites out on the Internet alone. Each site contains upwards of several megabytes of public information. The amount of data is staggering and even the smartest caching scheme cannot account for the variation in usage patterns among users and the likely hood they will hit an un-cached page.

Protocol Spoofing

Historically, there are client server applications that were developed for an internal LAN. Many of these applications are considered chatty. For example, to complete a transaction between a client and server, 10’s of messages may be transmitted, when perhaps one or two would suffice. Everything was fine until companies-for logistical and other reasons extended their LANs across the globe using WAN links to tie different locations together.

To get a better visual on what goes on in a chatty application perhaps an analogy will help with getting a picture in your mind. Suppose you were sending a letter to family members with your summer vacation pictures, and, for some insane reason, you decided to put each picture in a separate envelope and mail them individually on the same mail run. Obviously, this would be extremely inefficient.

What protocol spoofing accomplishes is to fake out the client or server side of the transaction and then send a more compact version of the transaction over the Internet, i.e. put all the pictures in one envelope and send it on your behalf thus saving you postage…

You might ask why not improve the inefficiencies in these chatty applications rather than write software to deal with the problem?

Good question, but that would be the subject of a totally different white paper on how IT organizations must evolve with legacy technology. It’s just beyond the scope of our white paper.

Application Shaping

One of the most popular and intuitive forms of optimizing bandwidth is a method called “application shaping” with aliases of “traffic shaping”, “bandwidth control”, and perhaps a few others thrown in for good measure. For the IT manager that is held accountable for everything that can and will go wrong on a network, or the CIO that needs to manage network usage policies, this is a dream come true. If you can divvy up portions of your WAN link to various applications then you can take control of your network and insure that important traffic has sufficient bandwidth.

At the center of application shaping is the ability to identify traffic by type. Is this Citrix traffic, streaming Audio, Kazaa peer to peer or something else?

The Fallacy of Internet Ports and Application Shaping

Many applications are expected to use Internet ports when communicating across the Internet. An Internet port is part of an Internet address, and many firewall products can easily identify ports and block or limit them. For example, the “FTP” application commonly used for downloading files uses the well know “port 21”. The fallacy with this scheme, as many operators soon find out, is that there are many applications that do not consistently use a fixed port for communication. Many application writers have no desire to be easily classified. In fact, they don’t want IT personnel to block them at all, so they deliberately design applications to not conform to any formal port assignment scheme. For this reason, any product that purports to block or alter application flows, by port, should be avoided if your primary mission is to control applications by type.

So, if standard firewalls are inadequate at blocking applications by port what can help?

As you are likely aware, all traffic on the Internet travels around in what is called an IP packet. An IP packet can very simply be thought of as a string of characters moving from Computer A to Computer B. The string of characters is called the “payload,” much like the freight inside a railroad car. On the outside of this payload, or data, is the address where it is being sent. These two elements, the address and the payload, comprise the complete IP packet. In the case of different applications on the Internet we would expect to see different kinds of payloads. For example, let’s take the example of a skyscraper being transported from New York to Los Angeles. How could this be done using a freight train? Common sense suggests that one would disassemble the office tower, stuff it into as many freight cars as it takes to transport it, and then when the train arrived in Los Angeles hopefully the workers on the other end would have the instructions on how to reassemble the tower.

Well, this analogy works with almost anything that is sent across the Internet, only the payload is some form of data, not a physical hunk of bricks, metal and wires. If we were sending a Word document as an e-mail attachment, guess what? The contents of the document would be disassembled into a bunch of IP packets and sent to the receiving e-mail client where it would be re-assembled. If I looked at the payload of each Internet packet in transit I could actually see snippets of the document in each packet and could quite easily read the words as they went by.

At the heart of all current application shaping products is special software that examines the content of Internet packets, and through various pattern matching techniques determines what type of application a particular flow is.

Once a flow is determined then the application shaping tool can enforce the operators policies on that flow.  Here are some examples:

  • Limit AIM messenger traffic to 100kbs
  • Reserve 500kbs for Shoretell voice traffic

The list of rules you can apply to traffic types and flow is unlimited.

The Downside to Application Shaping

Application shaping does work and is a very well thought out logical way to set up a network. After all, complete control over all types of traffic should allow an operator to run a clean ship, right? But as with any euphoric ideal there are drawbacks to the reality that you should be aware of.

  1. The number of applications on the Internet is a moving target. The best application shaping tools do a very good job of identifying several thousand of them, and yet there will always be some traffic that is unknown (estimated at ten percent by experts from the leading manufactures). The unknown traffic is lumped into the unknown classification and an operator must make a blanket decision on how to shape this class. Is it important? Is it not? Suppose the important traffic was streaming audio for a web cast and is not classified. Well, you get the picture. Although theory behind application shaping by type is a noble one, the cost for a company to keep current is large and there are cracks.
  2. Even if the application spectrum could be completely classified, the spectrum of applications constantly changes. You must keep licenses current to insure you have the latest in detection capabilities. And even then it can be quite a task to constantly analyze and change the mix of policies on your network. As bandwidth costs lessen, how much human time should be spent divvying up and creating ever more complex policies to optimize your WAN traffic?

Equalizing

Take a minute to think about what is really going on in your network to make you want to control it in the first place.

We can only think of a few legitimate reasons to do anything at all to your WAN: “The network is slow”, or “My VoIP call got dropped”.

If such words were never uttered than life would be grand.

So you really only have to solve these issues to be successful. Who cares about the actual speed of the WAN link or the number and types of applications running on your network or what port they are using, if you never hear these two complaints?

Equalizing goes at the heart of congestion using the basic principal of time. The reason why a network is slow or a voice call breaks up is that the network is stupid. The network grants immediate access to anybody who wants to use it, no matter what their need is. That works great much of the day when networks have plenty of bandwidth to handle all traffic demands, but it is the peak usage demands that play havoc.

Take the above statement with some simple human behavior factors. People notice slowness when real time activities break down. Accessing a web page, or sending an e-mail , chat session, voice call. All these activities will generate instant complaints if response times degrade from the “norm”.

The other fact of human network behavior is that there are bandwidth intensive applications, peer to peer, large e-mail attachments, data base back ups. These bandwidth intensive activities are attributed to a very small number of active users at any one time which makes it all the more insidious as they can consume well over ninety percent of a network’s resources at any time. Also, most of these bandwidth intensive applications can be spread out over time without notice from the user.

That data base back up for example: does it really need to be completed in three minutes at 5:30 on a Friday, or can it be done over six minutes and complete at 5:33? That would give your network perhaps fifty percent more bandwidth at no additional cost and nobody would notice. It is unlikely the user backing up their local disk drive is waiting for it to complete with stop watch in hand.

It is these unchanging human factor interactions that allow equalizing to work today, tomorrow and well into the future without need for upgrading. It looks at the behavior of the applications and usage patterns. By adhering to some simple rules of behavior the real time applications can be identified from the heavy non real time activities and thus be granted priority on the fly without any specific policies set by the IT Manager.

How Equalizing Technology Balances Traffic

Each connection on your network constitutes a traffic flow. Flows vary widely from short dynamic bursts, for example, when searching a small website, to large persistent flows, as when performing peer-to-peer file sharing.

Equalizing is determined from the answers to these questions:

  1. How persistent is the flow?
  2. How many active flows are there?
  3. How long has the flow been active?
  4. How much total congestion is currently on the trunk?
  5. How much bandwidth is the flow using relative to the link size?

Once these answers are known then Equalizing makes adjustments to flow by adding latency to low-priority tasks so high-priority tasks receive sufficient bandwidth. Nothing more needs to be said and nothing more needs to be administered to make it happen, once set up it need not be revisited.

Exempting Priority Traffic

Many people often point out that although equalizing technology sounds promising that it may be prone to mistakes with such a generic approach to traffic shaping. What if a user has a high priority bandwidth intensive video stream that must get through, wouldn’t this be the target of a miss-applied rule to slow it down?

The answer is yes, but what we have found is that high bandwidth priority streams are usually few in number and known by the administrator; they rarely if ever pop up spontaneously, so it is quite easy to exempt such flows since they are the rare exception. This is much easier than trying to classify every flow on your network at all times.

Connection Limits

Often overlooked as a source of network congestion is the number of connections a user generates. A connection can be defined as a single user communicating with a single Internet site. Take accessing the Yahoo home page for example. When you access the Yahoo home page your browser goes out to Yahoo and starts following various links on the Yahoo page to retrieve all the data. This data is typically not all at the same Internet address, so your browser may access several different public Internet locations to load the Yahoo home page, perhaps as many as ten connections over a short period of time. Routers and access points on your local network must keep track of these “connections” to insure that the data gets routed back to the correct browser. Although ten connections to the Yahoo home page is not excessive over a few seconds there are very poorly behaved applications, (most notably Gnutella, Bear Share, and Bittorrent), which are notorious for opening up 100’s or even 1000’s of connections in a short period of time. This type of activity is just as detrimental to your network as other bandwidth eating applications and can bring your network to a grinding halt. The solution is to make sure any traffic management solution deployed incorporates some form of connection limiting features.

Simple Rate Limits

The most common and widely used form of bandwidth control is the simple rate limit. This involves putting a fixed rate cap on a single IP address as per often is the case with rate plans promised by ISPs to their user community. “2 meg up and 1 meg down” is a common battle cry, but what happens in reality with such rate plans?

Although setting simple rates limits is far superior to running a network wide open we often call this “set, forget, and pray”!

Take for example six users sharing a T1 if each of these six users gets a rate of 256kbs up and 256kbs down. Then these six users each using their full share of 256 kilo bits per second is the maximum amount a T1 can handle. Although it is unlikely that you will hit gridlock with just six users, when the number of users reaches thirty, gridlock becomes likely, and with forty or fifty users, it becomes a certainty to happen quite often. It is not uncommon for schools, wireless ISPs, and executive suites to have sixty users to as many as 200 users sharing a single T1 with simple fixed user rate limits as the only control mechanism.

Yes, simple fixed user rate limiting does resolve the trivial case where one or two users, left unchecked, can use all available bandwidth; however unless your network is not oversold there is never any guarantee that busy-hour conditions will not result in gridlock.

Conclusion

The common thread to all WAN optimization techniques is they all must make intelligent assumptions about data patterns or human behavior to be effective. After all, in the end, the speed of the link is just that, a fixed speed that cannot be exceeded. All of these techniques have their merits and drawbacks, the trick is finding a solution best for your network needs. Hopefully the background information contained in this document will give you information so you the consumer can make an informed decision.

Optimizing Your WAN Is Not The Same As Optimizing Your Internet Link — Here’s Why…


WAN optimization is a catch-all phrase for making a network more efficient. However, few products distinguish between optimizing a WAN link and optimizing an Internet link. Yet, the methods used for the latter do not necessarily overlap with WAN optimization. In this article, we’ll break down the differences and similarities between the two practices and explain why WAN optimization tends to be the more common, yet not necessarily most effective, of the two techniques when it comes to overall network optimization.

Some Basic Definitions

A WAN link is always a point-to-point link where an institution/business controls both ends of the link. However, a WAN link does not provide Internet access.

On the other hand, an Internet link is one where one end terminates in a business/home/institution and the other end terminates in the Internet cloud, thus providing the former with Internet access.

A VPN link is a special case of a WAN link where the link traverses across the public Internet to get to another location within an organization.  This is not an Internet link by our definition mentioned above.

Whether dealing with a small business, a home user, or public entities such as libraries, schools etc., there are far more Internet links out there than WAN links. Each of these entities will most certainly have a dedicated Internet link while many will not have a WAN link.

Some Common Questions

If Internet links far outnumber WAN links, why are there so many commercial products dedicated to optimizing WAN links and so few specifically dedicated to Internet optimization?

There are a few reasons for this:

  1. WAN optimization is fairly easy to measure and quantify, so a WAN optimization vendor can easily demonstrate their value by showing before and after results.
  2. Many WAN-based applications — Citrix, SQL queries, etc. — are inherently inefficient and in need of optimization.
  3. The market is flooded with vendors and analysts (such as Gartner) which all tend  to promote and sustain the WAN optimization market.
  4. WAN optimization tools also double as reporting and monitoring tools, which administrators gravitate toward.
  5. A large number of commercial Internet connection are located at Small or medium sized business and and the ROI on an optimization device for their Internet Link is either not that compelling or not understood.

Why is a WAN optimizing tool not the best tool to optimize an Internet link? Don’t the methodologies overlap?

Most of the methods used by a WAN optimizing appliance make use of two principles:

  1. The organization owns both ends of the link and will use two optimizing devices — one at each end. For example, compression techniques require that you own both ends of the link. As mentioned earlier, you cannot control both ends of an Internet link.
  2. The types of traffic running over a WAN Link are consistent and well defined. Organizations tend to do the same thing over and over again on their internal link. Yet, on an Internet link, the traffic varies from minute to minute and cannot be easily quantified.

So, how does one optimize unbounded traffic coming into an Internet link?

You need an appliance such as a NetEqualizer that dynamically manages over all flows for more information you can read. But,  don’t take it from us, you can also check in on what existing NetEqualizer users are saying.

How does a company quantify the cost of using a device to optimize their Internet link?

Admittedly, the results may be a bit subjective. The good news is that optimization companies will normally allow you to try an appliance before you buy. On the other hand, most Internet providers will require you to purchase a fixed length contract.

The fact of the matter is that an Internet link can be rendered useless by  a small number of users during peak times. If you blindly upgrade your contract to accommodate this problem, it is akin to buying gourmet lunches for some employees while feeding everybody else microwave popcorn. In the end, the majority will be unhappy.

While the appropriate network optimization technique will vary from situation to situaiton, Internet optimization appliances tend to work well under most circumstances and are worth implementing. Or, at the very least, they’re worth exploring before signing on to a long-term bandwidth increase with your ISP.

See: Related Discussion on Internet Congestion and predictability.

NetEqualizer White Paper Comparison with Traditional Layer-7 (Deep Packet Inspection Products)


Updated with new reference material May 4th 2009

How NetEqualizer compares to Packeteer, Allot, Cymphonics, Exinda

We often get asked how NetEqualizer compares to Packeteer, Allot, Cymphonics, Exinda and a plethora of other well-known companies that do layer 7 application shaping (packet shaping). After several years of these questions, and discussing different aspects with former and current application shaping IT administrators, we’ve developed a response that should clarify the differences between NetEqualizers behavior based approach and the rest of the pack.

We thought of putting our response into a short, bullet-by-bullet table format, but then decided that since this decision often involves tens of thousands of dollars, 15 minutes of education on the subject with content to support the bullet chart was in order. If you want to see just the bullet chart, you can skip to the end now, but if you’re looking to have the question answered as objectively as possible, please take a few minutes to read on

In the following sections, we will cover specifically when and where application shaping (deep packet inspection) is used, how it can be used to your advantage, and also when it may not be a good option for what you are trying to accomplish. We will also discuss how the NetEqualizer and its behavior-based shaping fits into the landscape of application shaping, and how in some cases the NetEqualizer is a much better alternative.

First off, let’s discuss the accuracy of application shaping. To do this, we need to review the basic mechanics of how it works.

Application shaping is defined as the ability to identify traffic on your network by type and then set customized policies to control the flow rates for each particular type. For example, Citrix, AIM, Youtube, and BearShare are all applications that can be uniquely identified.

As you are likely aware, all traffic on the Internet travels around in what is called an IP packet. An IP packet can very simply be thought of as a string of characters moving from computer A to computer B. The string of characters is called the “payload,” much like the freight inside a railroad car. On the outside of this payload is the address where it is being sent. On the inside is the data/payload that is being transmitted. These two elements, the address and the payload, comprise the complete IP packet. In the case of different applications on the Internet, we would expect to see different kinds of payloads.

At the heart of all current application shaping products is special software that examines the content of Internet packets as they pass through the packet shaper. Through various pattern matching techniques, the packet shaper determines in real time what type of application a particular flow is. It then proceeds to take action to possibly restrict or allow the data based on a rule set designed by the system administrator.

For example, the popular peer-to-peer application Kazaa actually has the ASCII characters “Kazaa” appear in the payload, and hence a packet shaper can use this keyword to identify a Kazaa application. Seems simple enough, but suppose that somebody was downloading a Word document discussing the virtues of peer-to-peer and the title had the character string “Kazaa” in it. Well, it is very likely that this download would be identified as Kazaa and hence misclassified. After all, downloading a Word document from a Web server is not the same thing as the file sharing application Kazaa.

The other issue that constantly brings the accuracy of application shaping under fire is that some application writers find it in their best interest not be classified. In a mini arms race that plays out everyday across the world, some application developers are constantly changing their signature and some have gone as far as to encrypt their data entirely.

Yes, it is possible for the makers of application shapers to counter each move, and that is exactly what the top companies do, but it can take a heroic effort to keep pace. The constant engineering and upgrading required has an escalating cost factor. In the case of encrypted applications, the amount of CPU power required for decryption is quite intensive and impractical and other methods will be needed to identify encrypted p2p.

But, this is not to say that application shaping doesn’t work in all cases or provide some value. So, let’s break down where it has potential and where it may bring false promises. First off, the realities of what really happens when you deploy and depend on this technology need to be discussed.

Accuracy and False Positives

As of early 2003, we had a top engineer and executive join APConnections direct from a company that offered application shaping as one of their many value-added technologies. He had first hand knowledge from working with hundreds of customers who were big supporters of application shaping:

The application shaper his company offered could identify 90 percent of the spectrum of applications, which means they left 10 percent as unclassified. So, right off the bat, 10 percent of the traffic is unknown by the traffic shaper. Is this traffic important? Is it garbage that you can ignore? Well, there is no way to know with out any intelligence, so you are forced to let it go by without any restriction. Or, you could put one general rule over all of the traffic – perhaps limiting it to 1 megabit per second max, for example. Essentially, if your intention was 100-percent understanding and control of your network traffic, right out the gate you must compromise this standard.

In fairness, this 90-percent identification actually is an amazing number with regard to accuracy when you understand how daunting application shaping is. Regardless, there is still room for improvement.

So, that covers the admitted problem of unclassifiable traffic, but how accurate can a packet shaper be with the traffic it does claim to classify? Does it make mistakes? There really isn’t any reliable data on how often an application shaper will misidentify an application. To our knowledge, there is no independent consumer reporting company that has ever created a lab capable of generating several thousand different applications types with a mix of random traffic, and then took this mix and identified how often traffic was misclassified. Yes, there are trivial tests done one application at a time, but misclassification becomes more likely with real-world complex and diverse application mixes.

From our own testing of application technology freely available on the Internet, we discovered false positives can occur up to 25 percent of the time. A random FTP file download can be classified as something more specific. Obviously commercial packet shapers do not rely on the free technology in open source and they actually may improve on it. So, if we had to estimate based on our experience, perhaps 5 percent of Internet traffic will likely get misclassified. This brings our overall accuracy down to 85 percent (combining the traffic they don’t claim to classify with an estimated error rate for the traffic they do classify).

Constantly Evolving Traffic

Our sources say (mentioned above) that 70 percent of their customers that purchased application shaping equipment were using the equipment primarily as a reporting tool after one year. This means that they had stopped keeping up with shaping policies altogether and were just looking at the reports to understand their network (nothing proactive to change the traffic).

This is an interesting fact. From what we have seen, many people are just unable, or unwilling, to put in the time necessary to continuously update and change their application rules to keep up with the evolving traffic. The reason for the constant changing of rules is that with traditional application shaping you are dealing with a cunning and wise foe. For example, if you notice that there is a large contingent of users using Bittorrent and you put a rule in to quash that traffic, within perhaps days, those users will have moved on to something new: perhaps a new application or encrypted p2p. If you do not go back and reanalyze and reprogram your rule set, your packet shaper slowly becomes ineffective.

And finally lest we not forget that application shaping is considered by some to be a a violation of Net Neutrality.

When is application shaping the right solution?

There is a large set of businesses that use application shaping quite successfully along with other technologies. This area is WAN optimization. Thus far, we have discussed the issues with using an application shaper on the wide open Internet where the types and variations of traffic are unbounded. However, in a corporate environment with a finite set and type of traffic between offices, an application shaper can be set up and used with fantastic results.

There is also the political side to application shaping. It is human nature to want to see and control what takes place in your environment. Finding the best tool available to actually show what is on your network, and the ability to contain it, plays well with just about any CIO or IT director on the planet. An industry leading packet shaper brings visibility to your network and a pie chart showing 300 different kinds of traffic. Whether or not the tool is practical or accurate over time isn’t often brought into the buying decision. The decision to buy can usually be “intuitively” justified. By intuitively, we mean that it is easier to get approval for a tool that is simple to conceptually understand by a busy executive looking for a quick-fix solution.

As the cost of bandwidth continues to fall, the question becomes how much a CIO should spend to analyze a network. This is especially true when you consider that as the Internet expands, the complexity of shaping applications grows. As bandwidth prices drop, the cost of implementing such a product is either flat or increasing. In cases such as this, it often does not make sense to purchase a $15,000 bandwidth shaper to stave off a bandwidth upgrade that might cost an additional $200 a month.

What about the reporting aspects of an application shaper? Even if it can only accurately report 90 percent of the actual traffic, isn’t this useful data in itself?

Yes and no. Obviously analyzing 90 percent of the data on your network might be useful, but if you really look at what is going on, it is hard to feel like you have control or understanding of something that is so dynamic and changing. By the time you get a handle on what is happening, the system has likely changed. Unless you can take action in real time, the network usage trends (on a wide open Internet trunk) will vary from day to day.1 It turns out that the most useful information you can determine regarding your network is an overall usage patter for each individual. The goof-off employee/user will stick out like a sore thumb when you look at a simple usage report since the amount of data transferred can be 10-times the average for everybody else. The behavior is the indicator here, but the specific data types and applications will change from day to day and week to week

How does the NetEqualizer differ and what are its advantages and weaknesses?

First, we’ll summarize equalizing and behavior-based shaping. Overall, it is a simple concept. Equalizing is the art form of looking at the usage patterns on the network, and then when things get congested, robbing from the rich to give to the poor. Rather than writing hundreds of rules to specify allocations to specific traffic as in traditional application shaping, you can simply assume that large downloads are bad, short quick traffic is good, and be done with it.

This behavior-based approach usually mirrors what you would end up doing if you could see and identify all of the traffic on your network, but doesn’t require the labor and cost of classifying everything. Applications such as Web surfing, IM, short downloads, and voice all naturally receive higher priority while large downloads and p2p receive lower priority. This behavior-based shaping does not need to be updated constantly as applications change.

Trusting a heuristic solution such as NetEqualizer is not always an easy step. Oftentimes, customers are concerned with accidentally throttling important traffic that might not fit the NetEqualizer model, such as video. Although there are exceptions, it is rare for the network operator not to know about these potential issues in advance, and there are generally relatively few to consider. In fact, the only exception that we run into is video, and the NetEqualizer has a low level routine that easily allows you to give overriding priority to a specific server on your network, hence solving the problem.

Another key element in behavior-based shaping is connections. Equalizing takes care of instances of congestion caused by single-source bandwidth hogs. However, the other main cause of Internet gridlock (as well as bringing down routers and access points) is p2p and its propensity to open hundreds or perhaps thousands of connections to different sources on the Internet. Over the years, the NetEqualizer engineers have developed very specific algorithms to spot connection abuse and avert its side effects.

This overview, along with the summary table below, should give you a good idea of where the NetEqualizer stands in relation to packet shaping.

Summary Table

Application based shaping

  • good for static links where traffic patterns are constant

  • good for intuitive presentations makes sense and easy to explain to non technical people
  • detailed reporting by application type
  • not the best fit for wide open Internet trunks
    • costly to maintain in terms of licensing

    • high initial cost

    • constant labor to tune with changing application spectrum

    • expect approximately 15 percent of traffic to be unclassified

  • only a static snapshot of a changing spectrum may not be useful
  • false positives may show data incorrectly no easy way to confirm accuracy
  • violates Net Neutrality

Equalizing

  • not the best for dedicated WAN trunks

  • the most cost effective for shared Internet trunks
  • little or no recurring cost or labor
  • low entry cost
  • conceptual takes some getting used to
  • basic reporting by behavior used to stop abuse
  • handles encrypted p2p without modifications or upgrades
  • Supports Net Neutrality

1 The exception is a corporate WAN link with relatively static usage patterns.

Note: Since we first published this article, deep packet inspection also known as layer 7 shaping has taken some serious industry hits with respect to US based ISPs

Related articles:

Why is NetEqualizer the low price leader in bandwidth control

When is deep packet inspection a good thing?

NetEqualizer offers deep packet inspection comprimise.

Internet users attempt to thwart Deep Packet Inspection using encryption.

Why the controversy over deep Packet inspection?

World wide web founder denounces deep packet inspection

ROI calculator for Bandwidth Controllers


Is your commercial Internet link getting full ? Are you evaluating whether to increase the size of your existing internet pipe and trying to do a cost trade off on investing in an optimization solution? If you answered yes to either of these questions then you’ll find the rest of this post useful.

To get started, we assume you are somewhat familiar with the NetEqualizer’s automated fairness and behavior based shaping.

To learn more about NetEqualizer behavior based shaping  we suggest our  NetEqualizer FAQ.

Below are the criteria we used for our cost analysis.

1) It was based on feedback from numerous customers (different verticals) over the previous six years.

2) In keeping with our policies we used average and not best case scenarios of savings.
3) Our Scenario is applicable to any private business or public operator that administers a shared Internet Link with 50 or more users

4) For our example  we will assume a 10 megabit trunk at a cost of $1500 per month.

ROI savings #1 Extending the number of users you can support.

NetEqualizer Equalizing and fairness typically extends the number of users that can share a trunk by making better use of the available bandwidth in a time period. Bandwidth can be stretched from 10 to 30 percent:

savings $150 to $450 per month

ROI savings #2 Reducing support calls caused by peak period brownouts.

We conservatively assume a brownout once a month caused by general network overload. With a transient brownout scenario you will likely spend debug time  trying to find the root cause. For example, a bad DNS server could the problem, or your upstream provider may have an issue. A brownout  may be caused by simple congestion .   Assuming you dispatch staff time to trouble shoot a congestion problem once a month and at an overhead  from 1 to 3 hours. Savings would be $300 per month in staff hours.

ROI savings #3 No recurring costs with your NetEqualizer.

Since the NetEqualizer uses behavior based shaping your license is essentially good for the life of the unit. Layer 7 based protocol shapers must be updated at least once a year.  Savings $100 to $500 per month

The total

The cost of a NetEqualizer unit for a 10 meg circuit runs around $3000, the low estimate for savings per month is around $500 per month.

In our scenario the ROI is very conservatively 6 months.

Note: Commercial Internet links supported by NetEqualizer include T1,E1,DS3,OC3,T3, Fiber, 1 gig and more

Related Articles

One Gigabit NetEqualizer Announced Today


Editors Note: We expect to go higher than 1 gigabit and 12,000 users in the near future. This is just a start.

APconnections Announces Fully Equipped One-Gigabit NetEqualizer Traffic Shaper for $8500

LAFAYETTE, Colo., Nov. 7/PRNewswire/ — APconnections, a leading supplier of plug-and-play bandwidth shaping products, today announced a one-gigabit enhancement to their NetEqualizer brand traffic shapers. The initial release will handle 12,000 users and sustained line speeds of one gigabit.

“Prior to this release, our largest model, the NE-3000 was rated for 350 megabits,” said Eli Riles, APconnections vice president of sales. “Many of our current customers liked our technology, but just needed a higher end machine.The other good news is that our current NE-3000 platform will be able to run this new version with just a software upgrade, no forklift required.”

Future releases are in the works for even higher speeds and more users, thus solidifying APConnections as the price-performance leader in the WAN optimization market place.

In its initial release, the one-gigabit model will start at $8,500 USD. For more information, contact APconnections at 1-800-918-2763 or via email at sales@netequalizer.com.

The NetEqualizer is a plug-and-play bandwidth control and WAN/Internet optimization appliance that is flexible and scalable. When the network is congested, NetEqualizer’s unique “behavior shaping” technology
gives priority to latency-sensitive applications, such as VoIP and email. Behavior based shaping is the industry alternative to Deep Packet Inspection (DPI). It does it all dynamically and automatically, improving on other bandwidth shaping technology available.

APconnections is a privately held company founded in 2003 and is based in Lafayette, Colorado.

Contact: APconnections, 1-800-918-2763

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