The Rebirth of Wired Bandwidth


By Art Reisman. CTO http://www.netequalizer.com

As usual marketing expectations for internet speed have out-run reality; only this time reality is having a hard time catching up.

I am starting to get spotty yet reliable reports, from sources at some of the larger wireless carriers, that the guys in the trenches charged with supporting wireless technology are about ready to throw in the towel.  The reports are coming in from technicians who work with the large service providers.

No, I am not predicting the demise of wireless bandwidth and devices, but I am claiming we are at their critical saturation point. In the near future we will likely see only small incremental improvements in wireless data speeds.

The common myth with technology, especially in the first few decades, is that improvements are endless and infinite.  Yes, the theory is validated with technologies that are relatively new and moving fast, but the physical world eventually puts the brakes on.

For example, air travel saw huge jumps in comfort and speed for a 20 year span from the 1930’s to the 1950’s, culminating in jet travel across oceans.  While trans-ocean travel became a reality about 50 years ago, since that time there have been no improvements in speed. The Concorde was just not practical; as a result we have seen no net improvements in jet travel speed in 50 years.

Well, the same goes for wireless technology in 2013. The airwaves are saturated, the frequencies can only carry so much bandwidth.  Perhaps there will be one last gasp of innovation, similar to WDM on wired networks, but the future of high-speed computing will require point-to-point wires.  For this reason, I am still holding onto my prediction that we will see plugins for your devices start to pop up again as an alternative and convenience to wireless in the near future.

Related posts:

The truth about the wireless bandwidth crises This article assumes that there is a payment problem with the cost of paying for the technology.

ISP speed claim dilemma.

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